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t3knomanser's Fustian Deposits

Sisyphus was considered by the Greeks many things. He was the wisest…

How Random Babbling Becomes Corporate Policy

run the fuck away

Mad science gone horribly, horribly wrong(or right).

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run the fuck away
Sisyphus was considered by the Greeks many things. He was the wisest man, a highwayman, he put Death in chains and returned from the Underworld to live again. The gods punished him for those last two, and he was condemned to forever roll a boulder up a hill, only to have it roll back down.

"If this myth is tragic, that is because its hero is conscious. Where would hist torture be, indeed, if at every step the hope of succeeding upheld him? The workman of today works every day in his life at the same tassks, and this fate is no less anbsurd. but it is tragic only at the rare moments when it becomes conscious. Sisyphus, proletarian of the gods, powerless and rebellious, knows the whole extent of his wrteched condition: it is what he thinks of during his descent. The lucidity that was to constitute his torture at the same time crowns his victory...

If the descent is thus sometimes performed in sorrow, it can also take place in joy. This word is not too much. Again I fancy Sisyphus returning toward his rock, and the sorrow was in the beginning. When the images of earth cling too tightly to memory, when the call of happiness becomes too insistent, it happens that melancholy rises in man's heart: this is the rock's victory, this is the rock itself...
Happiness and the absurd are two sons of the same earth. They are inseperable. It would be a mistake to say that happiness necessarially springs from the absurd discovery. It happens as well that the feelings of the basurd spring from happiness. "I conclude that all is well," says Oedipus, and that remark is sacred. It echoes in the wild and limited universe of man. It teaches that all is not, has not been, exhauseted. It drives out of this world a god who had come into it with disatisfaction and a preference for futile sufferings. It makes of fate a human matter, which must be settled among men...
I leeave Sisyphus at the foot of the mountain! One always finds one's burden again. But Sisyphus teaches the higher fidelity that negates the gods and raises rocks. He too concludes that all si well. This universe henceforth without a master seems to him neither sterile nor futile. Each atom of that stone, each mineral flake of that night filled mountain, in itself forms a rowld. The struggle intself towards the heights is enought to fill a man's heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy."


-Albert Camus.

God I love that.
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